RESEARCH & PUBLICATIONS



Duff distribution influences fire severity and post-fire vegetation recovery in sagebrush steppe

In this study, field sampling and analysis were conducted across environmental gradients following the 2007 Tongue-Crutcher Wildfire in southwestern Idaho to determine the conditions most influential in post-fire vegetation recovery patterns. Duff depth and fire severity were determined to be the most influential factors affecting post-fire vegetation response. 

The purpose of this study was to determine how accumulations of ground fuels beneath western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis ssp. occidentalis) canopies, composed of litter and duff, affect post-fire species response in sagebrush steppe and to quantify fuel loading patterns. Duff depth and fire severity were determined to be the most influential factors affecting post-fire vegetation response. Decreasing species richness and native perennial grass cover was represented along the increasing duff depth gradient. Species response grouped by fire severity revealed significant presence of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) in low severity sites and a dominance of snowbrush ceanothus (Ceanothus velutinus) in higher severity sites. Determining sub-crown surface fuel characteristics offers the potential to predict future patterns and processes as they relate to burn severity and vegetation recovery components in developing woodlands.