Fact Sheet / Brief

Synthesis/Technical Report icon

A review of PJ woodlands and new literature

Visit the new PJ website maintained by Rick Miller.

View the complete pinyon-juniper synthesis.

View fact sheet on pinyon-juniper ecology.
View fact sheet on pinyon-juniper history.
View fact sheet on pinyon-juniper ecohydrology.
View fact sheet on pinyon-juniper management and restoration.

This synthesis reviews current knowledge of pinyon and juniper ecosystems, in both persistent and newly expanded woodlands, for managers, researchers, and the interested public. We draw from a large volume of research papers to centralize information on these semiarid woodlands. The first section includes a general description of both the Great Basin and northern Colorado Plateau. The ecology section covers woodland and species life histories, biology, and ecology and includes a detailed discussion of climate and the potential consequences of climate change specific to the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau. The history section discusses 20,000 years of woodland dynamics and geographic differences among woodland disturbance regimes and resilience. The ecohydrology section discusses hydrologic processes in woodlands that influence soil conservation and loss; water capture, storage, and release; and the effect that woodland structure and composition have on these processes. The final section, restoration and management, covers the history of woodland management, the different methods used, the advantages and disadvantages of different vegetation treatments, and posttreatment vegetation responses. We also discuss successes and failures and key components that determine project outcomes important for consideration when restoring ecosystem function, integrity, and resilience.

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Road map for science-based, collaborative restoration of aspen

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With concern over the health of aspen in the Intermountain West, public and private land managers need better guidance for evaluating aspen condition and selecting and implementing actions that will be effective in restoring aspen health. The Utah Forest Restoration Group collaboratively synthesized a step-by-step approach for aspen restoration that was applicable to western U.S. forests. In a successful case study in shared stewardship, these restoration guidelines were applied to a challenging real-world setting.

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Acknowledging the presence of decision biases amongst emergency managers

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This study specifically surveyed county emergency managers; the individuals who are responsible for mitigating and responding to disaster events. The results suggest that emergency managers are subject to decision biases and by knowing this, we can improve emergency management and decision-making processes.

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How to be a seed connoisseur: UT Crop Improvement Assoc

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This brief explains how to find out what is in that container of seed. It is divided into three sections:

  1. How to decipher a seed analysis label
  2. How to comprehend a certified seed label
  3. How to take a representative seed sample for analysis
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AOSCA Native Plant Connection

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The Association of Official Seed Certifying Agencies (AOSCA) has implemented certification requirements and standards that accommodate plant germplasm (whether newly acquired accessions or named varieties) of native grasses, forbs, and woody plants. These certification procedures provide third-party verification of source, genetic identity, and genetic purity of wildland collected or field or nursery grown plant germplasm materials. This bulletin defines AOSCA plant germplasm types, describes certification procedures and labeling, and summarizes supporting guidelines, tables, and flow charts.

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Herbicides for cheatgrass: What works?

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This webinar covers existing products that are effective and how they are applied in different situations. It will also introduce new emerging herbicides. Richard D. Lee, Integrated Pest Management Specialist, BLM National Operations Center, presents.

This webinar was the second in our 2018 Webinar Series: Moving the Needle on Cheatgrass: Putting What We Know into Practice.

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Grazing to maintain perennial grasses and reduce nonnative annuals

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This webinar discusses the benefits of altering timing of grazing to reduce annuals and maintain perennial bunchgrasses. It also discusses the detrimental impacts of repeated spring defoliation on perennials. Kirk Davies, Lead Rangeland Scientist with USDA ARS, presented.

This webinar was the third in our 2018 Webinar Series: Moving the Needle on Cheatgrass: Putting What We Know into Practice.

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Capitalizing on strategic opportunities: Examples from the field

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Brian Mealor, Associate Professor and Director of the Sheridan Research and Extension Center, UW, discusses strategic opportunities where land managers can intervene to move the needle on cheatgrass. It describes the level of invasion and management strategies applicable to each. Then, Mike Pellant, Ecologist, Retired BLM, discusses post-fire opportunities, cheatgrass die-off areas, and the myths and realities of dormant season targeted grazing.

This webinar was the fourth in our 2018 Webinar Series: Moving the Needle on Cheatgrass: Putting What We Know into Practice.

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Ecologically based invasive plant management: Lessons from the area-wide demonstration project

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This webinar discusses the process as well as take home messages from area-wide demonstration projects on cheatgrass reduction. Roger Sheley, USDA ARS, presented.

This webinar was the last in our 2018 Webinar Series: Moving the Needle on Cheatgrass: Putting What We Know into Practice.

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Cheatgrass control methods and their impacts on perennial grasses: A systematic review spanning 64 years

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Webinar recording.

Reducing cheatgrass has been a primary research topic and goal of ecological restoration for over 50 years. Our work examined published studies between 1946 and 2012 to identify how a broad range of control methods influence cheatgrass and perennial grass abundance. Based on this assessment, we identify obstacles encountered in achieving desired restoration and clarify what research is needed to develop improved mechanistic control strategies. Jeremy Maestas, Ecologist, USDA-NRCS, and Tom Monaco, Ecologist, USDA-ARS and USU, present.

This webinar is the first in our 2018 Webinar Series: Moving the Needle on Cheatgrass: Putting What We Know into Practice.

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