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Evolution of fire management and the role of knowledge

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The story of how fire managers slowed a fire and benefited the ecosystem. This was accomplished thanks to previous fires that were managed for resource benefit. This is the story of the 2021 Rafael Fire that started just 20 miles outside of Flagstaff, AZ. On day 2 the fire ran 12 miles towards town, causing evacuations and worry. Things changed on day 3, watch the video to learn more. This video contains beautiful drone footage of unhealthy forests and the benefits of fire. Thanks to a shift in fire management, a bad situation was transformed into a beneficial one.

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Native seeds: Supplying restoration- A nine-part video series

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Native Seeds: Supplying Restoration is a nine-part video series that explores the native seed supply chain in the western United States. Filmed over four seasons, this series weaves together footage of seed collectors, farmers, researchers, and land managers working to scale up the supply of native seeds to meet the growing restoration demand. We see the staggering scale of damage to vast landscapes and meet tenacious people who are finding creative, scrappy solutions to restore ecosystems.

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It’s just weird: Reading the Tea Leaves S4, E3

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It’s been a weird year so far. The west experienced an exceptionally cool and moist spring, especially in the southern extent of the region. Combined with above average snowpack, fuels stayed moist, and the fire season has had a very slow start. In fact, June saw the lowest area burned since 2000, but despite the slow start over 400 locations in the conterminous US have experienced record temperatures. Moreover, we have seen several weeks of anomalous heat waves, especially in the southwestern US. Yet still the fire season is slower than normal, but fuels are drying out fast.

In this 22-minute webcast, Research Ecologist Dr. Matt Reeves analyzes rangeland fuel conditions across the western US by evaluating the main factors of fuel amount and type, proximity to larger diameter fuel, drought conditions, and level of curing leading to senescent grasses in our simple but transparent hotspot algorithm. All 2022 recordings are located on the Reading the Tea Leaves page.

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An overview of the fuel situation in California: Reading the Tea Leaves S4, E3

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In this webcast, Research Ecologist Dr. Matt Reeves analyzes rangeland fuel conditions across California by evaluating the main factors of fuel amount and type, proximity to larger diameter fuel, drought conditions, and level of curing leading to senescent grasses in our simple but transparent hotspot algorithm. Projections are based on Reeves’ Fuelcasting system – a component of the Rangeland Production Monitoring Service that provides projections of expected fuel conditions this grazing season.

 

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Five key areas around the home to examine for fire risk

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Learn 5 key areas around your home to inspect when assessing your property’s wildfire risk.

 

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Returning fire to the land: Stewardship through traditional practices of the Séliš, Qĺispé and Ksanka

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For thousands of years, the vast majority of fires on the land were intentionally set by Indigenous Peoples of this region for a variety of reasons. Today, on the Flathead Reservation in Western Montana, the Division of Fire of the Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes’ Forestry Department is reclaiming a traditional relationship with fire on the landscape. Hear from the team about this work and how these fire dependent landscapes benefit from this holistic approach.

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Exploring innovation in a public land grazing system (7:17)

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In small communities like Plush, Oregon, where “The Need for Flexibility: Exploring Innovation in a Public Land Grazing System” was filmed, agriculture is a major economic contributor. Benefits extend far beyond the actual animal unit months provided to the producer. The creation of local jobs, community investments, and the stability provided by a balanced and documented approach to resource management all help foster resiliency in communities across the West. The Bureau of Land Management’s Outcome-based Grazing program offers a more collaborative approach between the BLM and its partners within the livestock grazing community when issuing grazing authorizations permits. The program allows for necessary, timely grazing adjustments that benefit the health of the rangeland for wildlife as well as its availability of forage for livestock.

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Sagebrush steppe short film: This land is part of us

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A short film produced by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Conservation Northwest.

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Sagebrush plant community responses 10 yrs after conifer removal

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This sageSTEP short features Beth Newingham.

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Effects of tree expansion and reduction on soil climate in a semiarid ecosystem

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The first installment of SageSTEP shorts features Bruce Roundy.

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