Fire Communication & Education

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5th National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy Workshop

Workshop website.

This Workshop is considered “mission critical” for anyone working on these issues in local, state, Tribal and federal agencies, and organizations as well as non-governmental organizations and private companies. There is no other forum in the nation that provides these opportunities.

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Scientist engagement with boundary organizations and knowledge coproduction: A case study of the Southwest Fire Science Consortium

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Overall, scientists more engaged with SWFSC reported involvement in a wider variety of knowledge coproduction activities. However, some knowledge coproduction activities, especially those requiring greater time investment or facing institutional barriers (e.g., research collaboration) were less common among all participants. Most scientists involved in knowledge coproduction believed that SWFSC increased their participation in these activities outside the boundary organization context, in part because SWFSC provided opportunities to interact with and understand the needs of managers/practitioners, as well as build research collaborations. Findings indicate that boundary organizations, such as SWFSC, can foster knowledge coproduction, but that they may need to further explore ways to address challenges for knowledge coproduction activities that involve greater time commitment or institutional challenges.

Climate and fire workbooks

Wildfire and climate change for teachers (grades 6-12)

Apply for the virtual workshop.

Engage your students in hands-on activities to explore climate change and wildfire in the Southwest! This standards-aligned curriculum unit developed in coordination with the USDA Southwest Climate Hub uses experiments, games, demonstrations, and a group project to introduce students to how increased temperature and changes in precipitation affect wildfire risk in ecosystems. In this workshop, you will hear from an expert in the field, participate in a Q&A session, and then get training to implement these lessons in your classroom. Participating teachers will receive a $50 stipend and the opportunity to win raffle prizes.

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How nostalgia drives and derails living with wildland fire in the American West

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This study assesses the affordances and constraints of each of these figures for helping and/or hindering fire management. It considers how some forms of nostalgia position particular humans as heroes and fire as a villain, how others prioritize the communities that come together to face catastrophic fire events, and how some romanticize Indigenous burning practices. Drawing on knowledge from fire science, human geography, and the environmental humanities, we suggest that a more nuanced understanding of nostalgia can be useful for fire management and for finding healthier ways of living with more fire in the future.

Living with Fire logo

Evacuation and Wildfire Preparation Community Event in Spring Creek, NV

Event registration.

This free community event will feature speakers from Living With Fire, Elko County Sheriff’s Department, Elko County Fire Protection District, Nevada Division of Forestry, NV Energy, Spring Creek HOA, U.S. Forest Service, and BLM-Elko District. Doors open at 5:30pm, and the presentations will begin at 6:00pm. Appetizers will be provided.

Living with Fire logo

Evacuation and Wildfire Preparation Community Event in Wellington, NV

Event registration.

This free community event will feature speakers from Living With Fire, East Fork Fire Protection District, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County, and University of Nevada, Reno Extension – Douglas County office, NV Energy, U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management – Carson City District, and Nevada Division of Forestry. Doors open at 5:30pm PDT, and the presentations will begin at 6:00pm. Appetizers will be provided.

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How nostalgia drives and derails living with wildland fire in the American West

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Representations of fire in the U.S. are often tinged with nostalgia: for unburned landscapes, for less frequent fires, for more predictable fire behavior, or for a simpler, more harmonious relationship between human communities and wildfire. Our perspective piece identifies four prevalent nostalgic figures that recur in popular representations of wildfire: the Giant Sequoia, the Heroic Firefighter engaged in “the Good Fight”, the Lone Frontiersman, and the “Noble Savage”. We assess the affordances and constraints of each of these figures for helping and/or hindering fire management. We consider how some forms of nostalgia position particular humans as heroes and fire as a villain, how others prioritize the communities that come together to face catastrophic fire events, and how some romanticize Indigenous burning practices. Drawing on knowledge from fire science, human geography, and the environmental humanities, we suggest that a more nuanced understanding of nostalgia can be useful for fire management and for finding healthier ways of living with more fire in the future

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Firesheds at a glance

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The Fireshed Registry is a geospatial dashboard for land managers and decision makers to view and map a vast array of data related to wildfire transmission, past, present, and future management, and past and predicted  wildfires. The Registry covers the full continental U.S and includes 192 million hectares of forest land. Fireshed delineations within the tool are not limited by administrative, jurisdictional, or other anthropogenic boundaries.

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New Mexico’s journey to shared landscape stewardship

Webinar registration.

In the past 5 years, New Mexico revised their Forest Action Plan, signed a Shared Stewardship Agreement with the USFS, and developed a Shared Stewardship Portal – all in alignment with the National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy. This webinar will focus on the State’s journey, the inclusiveness of the process with partners, and a demonstration of the portal and executive reporting dashboards that assist in delivering on the strategies and actions outlined in their Forest Action Plan. The webinar will include examples of New Mexico’s progress toward the Cohesive Strategy goals including the high-priority landscape – the Enchanted Circle.

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Becoming Firewise: Fire resistant landscapes and homes class

Class registration.

Description: This Free class teaches techniques and practices for protecting your home and property from damage associated with fire outside the home, especially wildfire. It covers:

  • Fire safe practices around the home to prevent fires
  • The basics of fire behavior as applied to the “Home Ignition Zone”
  • Landscaping techniques
  • Plant selection
  • Construction choices

There are steps that all home and property owners can take that can pay huge dividends. We’ll break down the barriers and explore ways to reduce your risk and keep your infrastructure and community safer from fire. Learning materials will be provided plus there will be Door Prizes!

Guest Speakers: John Rizza, Regional Fire Specialist, Northeast Oregon, Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Fire Program, Oregon State University Extension Service, and Al Crouch, Fire Mitigation Specialist, Vale District Bureau of Land Management.

Location:
Treasure Valley Community College
650 College Boulevard
Science Center Room 104
Ontario, OR 97914

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