Fire Communication & Education

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Building effective partnerships with indigenous communities

Webinar registration.

The webinar outlines recommendations for working with Indigenous communities based on the knowledge that long term relationship building with these communities is the foundation upon which educational programs, research collaborations, and other initiatives must be co-created. This presentation seeks to define best practices in approach and process for establishing and maintaining effective collaborations with Indigenous communities that respect sovereignty and self-determination and which have application across many types of efforts. These practices will have a lasting impact on Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at universities, professional societies, educational organizations, and agencies, on the STEM workforce broadly, and for Indigenous youth and communities toward realization of their dreams and aspirations.

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Risk perceptions and mitigation behaviors of residents following a near-miss wildfire

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Our research was guided by the general question, does a near-miss wildfire influence residents’ perceptions and self-reported fire risk mitigation behaviors? Specifically, we examined the cognitive appraisals and physical risk factors influencing residents’ previous and planned mitigation actions both before and after the fire. Our findings show risk perceptions declined significantly after the fire while residents’ intentions to take nine different fire risk mitigation actions increased. These results suggest near-miss fire events result in simultaneous “let-downs” and “wake-up calls” among affected residents. Near-miss wildfires present a unique opportunity for wildfire community preparedness, outreach, and engagement programs to capitalize on an increased willingness to take risk mitigation actions. However, these programs may face difficulties in communicating the continued threat of subsequent fire events.

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Developing behavioral and evidence-based programs for wildfire risk mitigation

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The actions of residents in the wildland–urban interface can influence the private and social costs of wildfire. Wildfire programs that encourage residents to take action are often delivered without evidence of effects on behavior. Research from the field of behavioral science shows that simple, often low-cost changes to program design and delivery can influence socially desirable behaviors. In this research report, we highlight how behavioral science and experimental design may advance efforts to increase wildfire risk mitigation on private property. We offer an example in which we tested changes in outreach messaging on property owners’ interest in wildfire risk
information. In partnership with a regional wildfire organization, we mailed 4564 letters directing property owners to visit personalized wildfire risk webpages. By tracking visitation, we observed that 590 letter recipients (12%) sought information about their wildfire risk and response varied by community. This research–practice collaboration has three benefits: innovation in outreach, evidence of innovation through experimental design, and real impacts on interest in wildfire mitigation among property owners. Future collaborations may inform behavioral and evidence-based programs to better serve residents and the public interest as the risks from wildfires are projected to grow.

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National Association of Conservation Districts 2021 Annual Meeting

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Co-managing wildfire risk across boundaries

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Wildfire risk is shared across landscapes, ownerships, and administrative boundaries. Consequently, successful efforts to mitigate this risk depend on coordination of individual and collective actions across sets of public and private institutions and individuals associated with managing components of fire-prone landscapes. We need to understand how these diverse sets of actors, including individual residents, communities, non-profit organizations, and local, state, tribal, and federal agencies can and do interact and make decisions that affect fire and risk based on their rules, processes and social norms. Initiated in 2017, the Co-Management of Wildfire Risk Transmission Partnership (CoMFRT) brings together wildfire researchers, practitioners and decisionmakers to co-produce knowledge and actionable recommendations to support people and institutions successfully working together across scales and circumstances to best mitigate fire risk and build adaptation to wildfire. This presentation will provide an overview of the CoMFRT Partnership, key results and recommendations to date, and next steps all designed to underscore approaches for a variety of actors responsible for managing wildfire risk to better live with fire.

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Weekly CA fire science seminar series

Webinar series registration.

This online seminar series will cover the breadth of wildland fire research relevant to California and introduce researchers to new topics and research groups across the state. Topics will include fire weather, wildfire risk, fire ecology, remote sensing, emissions, fire dynamics, fire modeling and public health. Featuring many early-career researchers, this series is aimed at a highly interdisciplinary academic audience but is open to anyone interested in these topics.

View an up-to-date schedule here: https://frg.berkeley.edu/california-fire-science-seminar-series/

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Cross-boundary science-based tools to implement shared stewardship

Webinar recording.

Description:

  • Articulate successful applications of Good Neighbor Authority for tribes, counties, and states;
  • Provide examples of when tools like Good Neighbor Authority are unlikely to be successful;
  • Discuss how to use tools from the Tribal Forest Protection Act;
  • Discuss how to use tools from the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act; and
  • Discuss how to use Stewardship Contracting.

Presenters:

  • Rob Farrell, Virginia State Forester;
  • Jim Durglo, Intertribal Timber Council Wildland Fire Technical Specialist;
  • Lynn Sholty, USDA Forest Service Grants and Agreements Specialist; and
  • Nils Christoffersen, Wallowa Resources Executive Director.
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Co-managing wildfire risk across boundaries (CoMFRT)

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Wildfire risk is shared across landscapes, ownerships, and administrative boundaries. Consequently, successful efforts to mitigate this risk depend on coordination of individual and collective actions across sets of public and private institutions and individuals associated with managing components of fire-prone landscapes. We need to understand how these diverse sets of actors, including individual residents, communities, non-profit organizations, and local, state, tribal, and federal agencies can and do interact and make decisions that affect fire and risk based on their rules, processes and social norms. Initiated in 2017, the Co-Management of Wildfire Risk Transmission Partnership (CoMFRT) brings together wildfire researchers, practitioners and decisionmakers to co-produce knowledge and actionable recommendations to support people and institutions successfully working together across scales and circumstances to best mitigate fire risk and build adaptation to wildfire. This presentation will provide an overview of the CoMFRT Partnership, key results and recommendations to date, and next steps all designed to underscore approaches for a variety of actors responsible for managing wildfire risk to better live with fire.

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When wildfire hits: One community’s journey to recovery

Webinar recording.

Last summer’s wildfire events impacted many Oregonians. These events reminded us of how important it is to plan and be prepared for wildfire. Planning and preparing for wildfire can feel like a massive endeavor. What can we do? Who can help? How do we continue to build wildfire adapted and prepared communities? Every community is unique; however, you are not alone. We can learn from our neighbors whether they are next door, across the state or even in a different state.

For this webinar, we invited our neighbors from southwest Colorado to tell us their story. Join us and learn how one community was affected by wildfires in 2002 and their journey to come together, rebuild, and take the action needed to save their lives and property from wildfire and the impact their actions had on wildfires in their neighborhoods since.

What you will learn:

– How other communities in the west have adapted to living in a wildfire environment
– Tools and resources available to help you prepare for wildfire
– How to engage your neighbors and build capacity to strengthen your wildfire adapted community

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Use of science in wildland fire management: Barriers and facilitators

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This study developed a conceptual model that describes the possible uses of science in fire management (perception, planning, forecasting, implementation, assessment, communication, and policy), common barriers to science use (lack of science, uncertainty, funding/capacity, conflict), common facilitators to fire science use (collaboration, trust, boundary organizations, co-production), and factors that can act as facilitators or barriers to science use depending on their presence or absence (awareness, accessibility, relevance). In the context of our conceptual model, we reviewed 67 papers that examined fire science use between 1986 and 2019.

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