Webinar

Rangeland landscape

Communication strategies for range professionals – A webinar series

Webinar registration.

Rangeland professionals know a lot about rangeland ecology and management, but not about marketing, especially online communication. Online communication is here to stay, investing time now to learn more about it will prepare you for the future.

Rangeland landscape

Communication strategies for range professionals – A webinar series

Webinar registration.

Rangeland professionals know a lot about rangeland ecology and management, but not about marketing, especially online communication. Online communication is here to stay, investing time now to learn more about it will prepare you for the future.

Rangeland landscape

Communication strategies for range professionals- Webinar series

Webinar registration.

Rangeland professionals know a lot about rangeland ecology and management, but not about marketing, especially online communication. Online communication is here to stay, investing time now to learn more about it will prepare you for the future.

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Overview of Sagebrush Conservation Design

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Please join the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, Bureau of Land Management, Agricultural Research Service, and The Nature Conservancy on Sept. 22 at 100p MDT for a public webinar to overview the Sagebrush Conservation Design, a framework that is a part of a larger, ongoing, multi-agency/stakeholder effort to develop strategies for conserving the sagebrush biome, to be released the same day. This report and presentation will highlight how to use this product to enable diverse stakeholders to coordinate efforts to conserve and restore the imperiled sagebrush ecosystem and sustain the benefits that it provides to communities throughout the West.

SW Fire Science Consortium Logo

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Ecosystems of the western United States are experiencing vegetation type conversions (VTC) in response to land-use change, climate warming, and their interactive effects with wildland fire. VTC is one of the most pressing management issues in the southwestern US, yet current strategies to intervene and address change often use trial-and-error approaches devised after the fact. This presentation discusses findings on VTC challenges, management responses, and outcomes from the collective experience of managers, scientists, and practitioners across the southwestern US.

Ecological reorganization across the region is not only extensive – it is complex, predominantly driven by high-severity wildfire. By a large margin, affected semi-arid forests convert to shrubland, while chaparral and sagebrush areas nearly always convert to non-native grasses. Management interventions in VTC areas most often attempt to reverse changes, although these efforts cover only a small portion of high-severity burn areas undergoing VTC. Efforts to facilitate VTC are rare but hold the potential to cover large spatial areas.

The presenter’s findings underscore that type conversion is a common outcome of high-severity wildland fire in the southwestern US. As the drivers increase with climate change, VTC appears increasingly likely in many ecological contexts, and may require management paradigms to transition as well.

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Climate conversations: Wildfire

Webinar recording.

Climate change is increasing the frequency, severity, and extent of area burned by wildfires in the U.S., putting more people at risk of exposure to fire itself and to smoke, which can travel thousands of miles and affect the health of millions of people. A.R. “Ravi” Ravishankara (Colorado State University) will moderate a conversation between Sarah Coefield (Missoula City-County Health Department) and Erica Fischer (Oregon State University) about how planners and decision makers are coping with these challenges and working to protect the built environment and human health.

Fire Adapted Communities logo

An Introduction to the Fire Adapted Communities Pathways Tool

Webinar registration.

Join FAC Net and Travis Paveglio as they present the new Fire Adapted Communities Pathways Tool. The Fire Adapted Communities Pathways Tool helps users identify a range of fire adaptation practices and resources that research and experience indicate are more likely to work in the places they live.

Learn more about the tool (or download it in advance of the presentation) here: https://fireadaptednetwork.org/resources/fac-pathways-tool/

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Post-fire logging in southern Colorado: Changes to post-fire recovery

Webinar recording.

Following a wildfire, successful tree regeneration is mediated by multiple factors, from the microsite to landscape scale. This presentation demonstrates the importance of microsite conditions such as soil moisture and temperature in predicting conifer tree establishment. The speakers examined the footprint and behavior of a large 2018 wildfire in southern Colorado to understand how fire severity and post-fire logging influenced stand structure, fuels, vegetation, and soil microsite conditions. Their findings show that salvage-logged plots demonstrated lower daily average temperature and minimum soil moisture and higher fuel loading across most fuel size classes relative to unlogged plots, which also corresponded with a loss of dead standing wood and little to no canopy cover. Early post-fire conifer regeneration was low across all plots, but lower soil moisture and higher soil temperature negatively impacted the density of regeneration. Careful consideration of soil impacts and the associated changes to forest conditions should be taken when conducting post-fire logging to prevent detrimental effects on microsite conditions and forest recovery.

Climate Change in Grasslands

Understanding and using future projections for trust species

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North American grasslands are a regional priority of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). The South Central CASC, in partnership with the US FWS Science Applications Program, the Northwest CASC, and the North Central CASC, will be implementing a training series for grasslands conservation practitioners starting in May 2022. Through our training series, we will introduce practitioners to the science of climate change, explore the impacts, and discuss adaptation options available.

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PNW August 2022 Drought and Climate Outlook

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According to the August 2, 2022 U.S. Drought Monitor, 39.5% of the Pacific Northwest Drought Early Warning System (DEWS) is in drought. A very wet spring and early summer has greatly improved conditions compared to March, when over 70% of the region was in drought. However, a large part of Oregon is still in Extreme (D3)/Exceptional (D4) Drought, as are pockets in Idaho. This webinar will provide more information on the current conditions and outlooks, as well as two presentations on OpenET.

These webinars provide the region’s stakeholders and interested parties with timely information on current and developing drought conditions, as well as climatic events like El Niño and La Niña. Speakers will also discuss the impacts of these conditions on things such as wildfires, floods, disruption to water supply and ecosystems, as well as impacts to affected industries like agriculture, tourism, and public health.

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