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Biochar production, benefits, and barriers in forested lands

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Webinar sessions will be half presentation and half question and answer. All presenters are scientists at the Rocky Mountain Research Station.

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Pinyon-juniper treatments optimized: With considerations for sagebrush conservation, pinyon jays, and songbirds

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Webinar sessions will be half presentation and half question and answer. All presenters are scientists at the Rocky Mountain Research Station.

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Reflections from 20 years examining the social dynamics of fire management

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Sarah McCaffrey, retired in 2022 after 20 years as a fire social scientist with the US Forest Service where her research focused on understanding the social dynamics of fire management. This included research projects that examined the role of risk perception and risk attitudes, social acceptability of prescribed fire, homeowner mitigation decisions, evacuation decision making, risk communication, and agency-community interactions during fires. Since retirement she has been involved with a number of research and practitioner efforts to improve future fire outcomes including as an adviser to the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation’s Wildfire Resilience Initiative and Board member for Fire Adapted Colorado. She received her PhD in 2002 from the University of California at Berkeley where her dissertation examined Incline Village, Nevada homeowner views and actions in relation to defensible space and fuels management.

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Post-wildfire recovery through the principles of engineering with nature

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The Santa Clara Canyon in northern New Mexico suffered near total scorching during the Las Conchas Wildfire, a burn which drastically changed the environment and sediment stability of the canyon. After the fire, a 1% chance rain event exhibited a 400% increase in peak flow conditions when compared to pre-fire conditions due to extreme vegetation loss and subsequent soil instability. Since 2011, the Santa Clara Pueblo, Forestry Department has worked with partners to reduce flood hazard in the Pueblo by implementing Engineering with Nature principles: levee improvements, post-fire debris removal, integrating fish passage into the dams, contour felling on steep slopes, and constructing log and boulder structures to stabilize drainages and mitigate sediment transport and deposition.
Managing wildfire recovery efforts by applying Engineering With Nature-Natural and Nature-Based Features (EWN-NNBF) principles has the potential to provide a wide range of Flood Risk Management (FRM) benefits to rural and urban settings while increasing co-benefits for the entire watershed. Co-benefits include economic, social, archeological, aesthetic, recreational and biological functioning habitat enhancements. In this webinar, the presenter will discuss experiences gained and lessons learned that can be transferred to other areas within the Western US that experience wildfires and require FRM guidance on wildfire recovery methods.

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Wildfire and resilient landscapes: New tools for detailed analyses

Webinar recording.

Webinar sessions will be half presentation and half question and answer. All presenters are scientists at the Rocky Mountain Research Station.

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Developing a next-generation wildland fire intelligence platform

Webinar recording.

There is a compelling business case for additional investment in enhanced data acquisition and analysis to better assess the safety and effectiveness of wildfire management. As a result of long-standing data gaps, fire management organizations cannot recreate what happened during fire operations, leading to persistent challenges in: (1) demonstrating the nature and magnitude of suppression investments, (2) assessing what did and didn’t work, (3) improving future effectiveness based on what was learned, and (4) understanding and preventing firefighter injuries and deaths. Credible analysis of the safety and effectiveness of wildfire management requires a clearer understanding of strategic, tactical, and operational objectives. Further required is information on firefighting resource location and use at high-resolution spatial and temporal scales. To facilitate timely analysis, the relevant data need to be archived, digital, accessible, and searchable. In December 2021, RMRS entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with a private company, Ignis Technologies, interested in capturing and availing better real-time data and analytics around wildland firefighting response and resource use. We agreed on common goals of (1) enhancing situational awareness with cutting-edge technology and (2) amassing historically elusive data needed to advance research into suppression effectiveness and performance measurement in wildland fire management. This agreement provides a vehicle for greater collaboration with the interagency fire data community. We are currently working with interagency representatives of the National Wildfire Coordinating Group and Wildland Fire Information Technology to ensure that the data captured through our collaborative efforts are incorporated into the Interagency Data Management Environment (IDME), which is a modern architecture that enables governed, self-service analytics across wildland fire.

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Occupational health exposures of wildland firefighters

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Topic: Firefighter Exposures and Efficacy of Interventions
Presenter: Paul White
Delve into the unique health exposures faced by firefighters and learn about the current state of research on the effectiveness of interventions to mitigate exposure. Paul White will share valuable insights into improving occupational safety and health outcomes for firefighters.

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Wildfire smoke: Knowns and unknowns

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Topic: Wildfire Smoke and Human Health – The Knowns and the Unknowns
Presenter: Sarah Henderson
How does wildfire smoke affect our health? Learn about what’s in wildfire smoke, the impacts on health, the evidence gaps, and effective health protection strategies. Presented by Dr. Sarah Henderson, Scientific Director of Environmental Health Services at BCCDC and of the National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health (NCCEH), and Associate Professor at the University of British Columbia School of Population & Public Health.

Topic: Smoke Forecast Models – Making Informed Decisions
Presenter: Brian Wiens
Explore smoke forecast models with Brian Wiens, to increase your understanding of how they work and discover how to utilize these models to make informed decisions about your health.

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Seminars for managers from the RMRS Fire Lab

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In 2024, there are five Thursdays in February. To celebrate this rare event, the Fire Lab is hosting a series of five seminars that highlight new tools and research for managers. The “February Five” will occur during our regularly scheduled seminar series timeslot – Thursdays at 11am Mountain Time. Please join us on Teams. Select the titles below for connection information and to view recordings after the event.

FastFuels and QUIC-Fire: 3D fuel and fire modeling systems supporting prescribed fire
Feb 1, 2024: Russell Parsons, Research Ecologist

The Fire Weather Alert System
Feb 8, 2024: Jason Forthofer, Research Mechanical Engineer; Natalie Wagenbrenner, Research Meteorologist

Estimating forest characteristics such as carbon and tree growth over space and time using TreeMap, FIADB, and FVS
Feb 15, 2024: Karin Riley, Research Ecologist and John Shaw, Forest Inventory and Analysis

Behave7 Fire Modeling System: A Long Time Coming
Feb 22, 2024: Faith Ann Heinsch, Physical Scientist; LaWen Hollingsworth, Fire Behavior Specialist; Greg Dillon, Director, Fire Modeling Institute

Wildfire risk and mitigation opportunities in the US sagebrush biome
Feb 29, 2024: Karen Short, Research Ecologist

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Assessing ecological integrity and estimating ecological outcomes: Overview of the terrestrial condition assessment

Webinar registration.

Sarah Anderson, Ecologist, Forest Service, WO NFS Forest Management, Range Management, and Vegetation Ecology. Find Sarah’s Office Hour from 2023 here: https://youtu.be/Kf0P3cAq1rs

 

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