Invasive Species

SRM 2021 Conference logo

2022 Society for Range Management (SRM)’s 75th Annual Meeting

Meeting website.

Join us in the heart of New Mexico for the 75th Annual SRM Meeting. The beautiful high desert rangelands, diverse cultures, authentic art, and painted skies of Albuquerque will make for a great meeting.

Synthesis/Technical Report icon

We can better manage ecosystems by connecting solutions to constraints

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Here we synthesize and present a portfolio of broad structured approaches and specific actions that can be used to advance restoration of plant-invaded wetlands in a diversity of contexts immediately and over the long-term, linking these solutions to the constraints they best address. These solutions can be used by individual managers to chart a path forward when they are daunted by potentially needing to pivot from more familiar management actions to increase efficiency and efficacy in attaining restoration goals. In more complex collaborations with multiple actors, the shared vocabulary presented here for considering and selecting the most appropriate solution will be essential. Of course, every management context is unique (i.e., different constraints are at play) so we advocate that involved parties consider a range of potential solutions, rather than either assuming any single solution to be universally optimal or relying on a solution simply because it is familiar and feasible. Moving rapidly to optimally effective invasive plant management in wetlands may not be realistic, but making steady, incremental progress by implementing appropriate solutions based on clearly identified constraints will be critical to eventually attaining wetland restoration goals.

LANDFIRE logo

Putting LANDFIRE data and models to work in the scientific community

Webinar registration.

Members of the LANDFIRE Team will bring you a timely, relevant and succinct webinar describing three different applications of LANDFIRE data in published scientific literature from 2021. Our talk will start with a “30K foot view” of how LANDFIRE data is (generally) used by students, academics and agencies. We will then spotlight three example scientific papers each with a unique focus on drought, fire and climate change. We will highlight general findings, and touch on the LANDFIRE datasets, applications used for each journal article.

Papers we will discuss:
1. Drought Sensitivity and Trends of Riparian Vegetation Vigor in Nevada, USA (1985–2018) | Albano, Christina, McGwire, K.C., Hausner, M.B., McEvoy, D.J., Morton, C.G., Huntington, J.L. (LANDFIRE Existing Vegetation Type classification used)
2. The Importance of Small Fires for Wildfire Hazard in Urbanized Landscapes of the Northeastern US | Carlson, Amanda R., Sebasky, M.E., Peters, M.P, Radeloff, V.C (LANDFIRE Fuels products used)
3. Modelling Species Distributions and Environmental Suitability Highlights Risk of Plant Invasions in Western US | McMahon, Devin, E., Urza, A.K., Brown, J.L., Phelan, C., Chambers, J.C. (LANDFIRE Reference Database used)

There will be 15 minutes at the end of this discussion for Q/A. Bring your questions – we’ll see you there.

Journal article icon

Resilience to fire and resistance to annual grass invasion in sagebrush ecosystems of US National Parks

Approximately 70 park units include at least some sagebrush shrublands or steppe, but we identified 40 parks with substantial amounts (>20% of park area) that can be included in an agency-wide conservation strategy. Second, we examined detailed patterns of resilience and resistance, fire history and fire risk, cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) invasion, and sagebrush shrub (Artemisia spp.) persistence in five national park units in Columbia Basin and Snake River Plain sagebrush steppe, contextualized by the broader summary. In these five parks, fire frequency and size increased in recent decades. Cheatgrass invasion and sagebrush persistence correlated strongly with resilience, burn frequency (0–3 fires since ~1940), and burn probability, but with important variation, in part mediated by local-scale topography. Third, we used these insights to assemble strategic sagebrush ecosystem fire protection mapping scenarios in two additional parks – Lava Beds National Monument and Great Basin National Park. Readily available and periodically updated geospatial data including soil surveys, fire histories, vegetation inventories, and long-term monitoring support resiliency-based adaptive management through tactical planning of pre-fire protection, post-fire restoration, and triage. Our assessment establishes the precarious importance of the US national park system to sagebrush ecosystem conservation and an operational strategy for place-based and science-supported conservation.

Fire Weather Wildlife Symposium logo

Wildfire, Weather, Water, Weeds, Wildlife Symposium

Symposium registration.

This Symposium will:

  • Examine agency/utility wildfire safety, mitigation measures and resiliency planning for future fire weather
  • Learn about research focused on wildfire effects on water quality (sediment, contaminants) and water supply in our region and how we can improve our practices
  • Discuss how forests, shrublands and rivers are recovering or being impacted by invasive plants and biodiversity loss
  • Understand how state and local agencies are preparing and responding to increased threat of wildfire

Who will attend?
Planning and Public Works Professionals, Water Resources Professionals, Land Managers Public Health Professionals, Local Business Leaders, Civil Engineers, Regulators, Land Managers, Researchers, Education and Extension Specialists, Public Health Professionals, Developers, Landscape Architects, Community Based Organizations, Academics, Students, and any and all other interested parties.

Fire Weather Wildlife Symposium logo

Wildfire, Weather, Water, Weeds, Wildlife Symposium

Symposium registration.

This Symposium will:

  • Examine agency/utility wildfire safety, mitigation measures and resiliency planning for future fire weather
  • Learn about research focused on wildfire effects on water quality (sediment, contaminants) and water supply in our region and how we can improve our practices
  • Discuss how forests, shrublands and rivers are recovering or being impacted by invasive plants and biodiversity loss
  • Understand how state and local agencies are preparing and responding to increased threat of wildfire

Who will attend?
Planning and Public Works Professionals, Water Resources Professionals, Land Managers Public Health Professionals, Local Business Leaders, Civil Engineers, Regulators, Land Managers, Researchers, Education and Extension Specialists, Public Health Professionals, Developers, Landscape Architects, Community Based Organizations, Academics, Students, and any and all other interested parties.

Fire Weather Wildlife Symposium logo

Wildfire, Weather, Water, Weeds, Wildlife Symposium

Symposium registration.

This Symposium will:

  • Examine agency/utility wildfire safety, mitigation measures and resiliency planning for future fire weather
  • Learn about research focused on wildfire effects on water quality (sediment, contaminants) and water supply in our region and how we can improve our practices
  • Discuss how forests, shrublands and rivers are recovering or being impacted by invasive plants and biodiversity loss
  • Understand how state and local agencies are preparing and responding to increased threat of wildfire

Who will attend?
Planning and Public Works Professionals, Water Resources Professionals, Land Managers Public Health Professionals, Local Business Leaders, Civil Engineers, Regulators, Land Managers, Researchers, Education and Extension Specialists, Public Health Professionals, Developers, Landscape Architects, Community Based Organizations, Academics, Students, and any and all other interested parties.

Journal article icon

Historical fire and Ventenata dubia invasion in a temperate grassland

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Our data revealed that ventenata frequency and cover increased on all plots. However, there was not significantly higher abundance in burned plots in any of the sampling years. In addition, ventenata abundance did not increase more in burned plots over time. Our findings suggest that, unlike cheatgrass, fire may not be a driving factor in the spread and increase of ventenata across the PNB Prairie. This finding has important implications for the management and control of ventenata, as well as the conservation of the PNB Prairie.

Synthesis/Technical Report icon

Rangeland land-sharing, livestock grazing’s role in conservation

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A review of United States Fish and Wildlife Service listing documents for 282 threatened and endangered species in California reveals a complex and varied relationship between grazing and conservation. According to these documents, 51% or 143 of the federally listed animal and plant species are found in habitats with grazing. While livestock grazing is a stated threat to 73% (104) of the species sharing habitat with livestock, 59% (85) of the species are said to be positively influenced, with considerable overlap between species both threatened and benefitting from grazing. Grazing is credited with benefiting flowering plants, mammals, insects, reptiles, amphibians, fish, crustaceans, and bird species by managing the state’s novel vegetation and providing and maintaining habitat structure and ecosystem functions. Benefits are noted for species across all of California’s terrestrial habitats, except alpine, and for some aquatic habitats, including riparian, wetlands, and temporary pools. Managed grazing can combat anthropomorphic threats, such as invasive species and nitrogen deposition, supporting conservation-reliant species as part of land sharing.

Field tour/workshop icon

Fire science and management in an uncertain future: Tools and approaches for managing fire in future climates in the SW

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Read workshop summary.

Workshop purpose: Identify fire science and management needs and discuss tools and approaches to natural resource assessments and adaptation strategies for fire dynamics in future climates in Southwest (DOI Regions 8 & 10 [CA, NV, AZ]) bioregions.

Take-Aways:
Provide awareness of tools needed for decision-making in an uncertain future
Generate a list of new science actions to meet fire needs for practitioners/planners in future, non-analog landscapes and communities
Suggest how we might address and accomplish these identified needs going forward
Exchange Information
Make connections

This four-hour, virtual Summit was an abbreviated, rescheduled version of ‘Building Bridges and Solutions: Partners in Facing Fire-Science Challenges’ that was cancelled in April due to COVID-19. We assembled scientists and fire practitioners/leaders in an interagency effort to identify fire science and management needs and to discuss decision-making tools and approaches that address resource assessments and adaptation strategies for fire dynamics in future climates in the Southwest (Department of Interior [DOI] Regions 8 and 10 [CA, NV, AZ]). This overriding goal threaded together the Summit’s talks, Q&A, and break-out sessions. Speakers from various agencies, institutes, and academia focused on fire management and planning in future non-analog landscapes and climate-fire-ecosystem impact relationships in western forest (e.g., mixed-conifer, subalpine), desert (hot and cold, grassland, pinyon-juniper, sage-steppe), and Mediterranean/chaparral bioregions. Syntheses from talks, Mentimeter-conducted discussions, and break-out groups on management and actionable-science needs will be summarized in a white paper and posted on the Southwest, Great Basin, and California Fire Science Exchange websites. Let’s work together to address fire science and management in an uncertain future!

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