Synthesis / Tech Report

Open book with a bar chart on left page and line graph and lines simulating text on the right page

Review of fuel treatment effectiveness in forests and rangelands and a case study from the 2007 megafires in central Idaho, USA

View synthesis.

This report provides managers with the current state of knowledge regarding the effectiveness of fuel treatments for mitigating severe wildfire effects.  A literature review examines the effectiveness of fuel treatments that had been previously applied and were subsequently burned through by wildfire in forests and rangelands. A case study focuses on WUI fuel treatments that were burned in the 2007 East Zone and Cascade megafires in central Idaho. Both the literature review and case study results support a manager consensus that forest thinning followed by some form of slash removal is most effective for reducing subsequent wildfire severity.

Open book with lines simulating text on left and right pages

Fire as a restoration tool: A decision framework for predicting the control or enhancement of plants using fire

View article.

This paper provides a decision framework that integrates fire regime components, plant growth form, and survival attributes to predict how plants will respond to fires and how fires can be prescribed to enhance the likelihood of obtaining desired plant responses.

Open book with a bar chart on left page and line graph and lines simulating text on the right page

Cumulative watershed effects of fuel management in the western United States

View synthesis.

This synthesis contains 14 chapters that cover fire and forests, machinery, erosion processes, water yield and quality, soil and riparian impacts, aquatic and landscape effects, and predictive tools and procedures. These chapters provide an overview of our current understanding of the cumulative watershed effects of fuel management in the western United States.

Open book with a bar chart on left page and line graph and lines simulating text on the right page

Ecological effects of prescribed fire season: a literature review and synthesis for managers

View report.

This study compared historical and prescribed fire regimes for different regions in the United States and synthesized literature on season of prescribed burning. In regions and vegetation types where considerable differences in fuel consumption exist among burning seasons, the effects of prescribed fire season appears to be driven more by fire-intensity differences among seasons than by phenology. Where fuel consumption differs little among burning seasons, the effect of phenology or growth stage of organisms is often more apparent.

Open book with a bar chart on left page and line graph and lines simulating text on the right page

Synthesis of knowledge on the effects of fire and fire surrogates on wildlife in U.S. dry forests

View report.

This document represents a synthesis of existing knowledge on wildlife responses to fire and fire-surrogate treatments, presented in a useful, management-relevant format. Based on scoping meetings and dialogue with public lands managers from throughout the United States, we provide detailed, species-level, summary tables for project biologists and fire managers trying to anticipate the effects of fire and fire-surrogate treatments on local wildlife species.

Open book with a bar chart on left page and line graph and lines simulating text on the right page

Imazapic – Ecological risk assessment: Final report

View report.

The main objectives of this ecological risk assessment were to evaluate the potential ecological risks from imazapic to the health and welfare of plants and animals and their habitats and to provide risk managers with a range of generic risk estimates that vary as a function of site conditions. The categories and guidelines listed below were designed to help the BLM
determine which of the proposed alternatives evaluated in the EIS should be used on BLM lands.

Open book with a bar chart on left page and line graph and lines simulating text on the right page

Biology, ecology, and management of western juniper

View synthesis.

This synthesis documents what is known about the history, biology, ecology, and management of western juniper. This synthesis will provide guidance for defining long-term goals, setting management priorities, and developing management plans and strategies related to western juniper. It is separated into six major sections: 1) distribution and history of woodland expansion, 2) life history and biology, 3) ecology; 4) hydrology, 5) restoration and management, and 6) management guidelines.

Open book with a bar chart on left page and line graph and lines simulating text on the right page

Postfire seeding for erosion control: Effectiveness and impacts on native plant communities

View synthesis.

Less than half of the studies reviewed in this synthesis showed reduced sediment movement with seeding. In all vegetation types, successful growth of seeded grasses—enough to affect erosion—appears to displace native or naturalized species, including shrub and tree seedlings. In burned sagebrush range, postfire seeding is frequently used to replace non-native cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) with native or introduced bunchgrasses, with at least short-term success. In recent years, native species and sterile cereal grains have increasingly been used for seeding. Use of aerially applied straw mulch has increased as well, with the risk of weed introduction from contaminated bales.

Narrow your search

Can't find what you need?

Stay Connected